Introduction

2 Ice Cream Production and Consumption Data

The World Scene

World production and consumption data that is easily comparable is difficult to find, due to wide variations in methods of reporting (volume, weight) and in categories of products included or excluded from the data. The table below shows annual ice cream consumption data (per capita, in litres) from selected countries.

 

Per capita Consumption of Ice Cream (2018)

Country Litres per capita
New Zealand 28
United States 21
Australia 18
Western Europe 7.2
Eastern Europe 3.5
Global 2.4
Latin America 2.3
Asia Pacific 1.7
Middle East and Africa 0.9

Source: Goff and Hartel, 2013.
{Note: both dairy- and non-dairy-fat based products are included}

 

The Canadian Scene

Some statistical data is presented below, which is now updated regularly and available at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canadian Dairy Information Centre.

 

Canadian Ice Cream Mix Production, kL

1980 154,792
1985 159,901
1990 162,905
1995 172,678
2000 137,869
2005 172,699
2006 171,271
2007 146,789
2008 129,151
2009 109,399
2010 111,953
2011 103,673
2012 95,050
2013 79,895
2014 70,801
2015 80,286
2016 87,986
2017 87,414
2018 88,826
2019 97,651

Source: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canadian Dairy Information Centre

 

Note: this is milkfat-based ice cream only. Since 2006, Frozen Dessert products have been on the market that are vegetable fat-based, rather than milkfat-based, and these are not captured in the statistics above. Frozen desserts due contain milk solids-not-fat, however. The dramatic effect these have had on ice cream production per se is illustrated by the numbers in the table below.

 

Provincial Ice Cream Mix Production, 2006 vs. 2016

Ontario 108,698 vs. 67,740
Others(1) 62,573 vs. 20,246

Source: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canadian Dairy Information Centre

 

(1) Not disclosed to protect individual company data.

 

Canadian Per capita consumption - hard and soft ice cream

1980 12.72
1985 12.02
1990 11.50
1995 11.39
2000 8.63
2005 9.85
2006 9.23
2007 8.0
2008 6.90
2009 5.54
2010 5.51
2011 5.25
2012 5.02
2013 4.42
2014 5.20
2015 4.52
2016 4.44
2017 3.90
2018 4.02

Source: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canadian Dairy Information Centre

 

Note: again, this is milkfat-based ice cream only and does not include consumption of Frozen Dessert products,  which are vegetable fat-based, rather than milkfat-based.

The Scene from the United States

Although not quite the largest consumer of ice cream and related products, the United States is the second largest producer, after China, at 5.3 billion liters in 2017 and sales of US$11 Billion. This can be sub-divided as follows: regular ice cream (58%), low-fat and non-fat ice cream (32.4%), water ice (4.6%), frozen yogurt (4.5%), and sherbet (2.9%). Comparing 2005 to 2015, there was growth in overall production of only 0.5%, a 6% decline in regular ice cream but a 20% increase in low fat ice cream. Hard frozen dairy products comprise 75% of US production while soft-frozen products comprise 25%, however these are not evenly divided amongst the categories. 87% of regular ice cream was hard-frozen, while 55% of frozen yogurt and 50% of lowfat ice cream was soft-frozen. The production of hard-frozen regular and lowfat products fell by 1.5% from 2005 to 2015 while the production of soft-frozen products increased by 7.7%. Per capita consumption of total frozen dairy products in the US dropped from 11.3 to 10.6 kg from 2005 to 2015, regular ice cream dropped from 7 kg to 6 kg while reduced fat ice cream increased from 2.7 to 3 kg during this time. (Source: Goff, H. D. 2020. Ice cream and frozen desserts: Product Types. In “Encyclopedia of Dairy Sciences, 3rd Edn.” Paul McSweeney and John McNamara, eds. Elsevier.)

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